Sun – Flowers

header-sunny-flowers

When collecting your materials for propagation be aware of the following:

1: Never remove plants or bulbs from the wild.
2: When seed collecting ensure you have the land owners permission to be on the land and to take the seeds.

 

PROPAGATION-A -SEEDS

Collect seeds when in season and stratify immediately and sow the following spring. They require no special treatment just let them weather and the frost to get to them.

PROPAGATION-B- DIVISION

Lift plant in Autumn and split root ball, pot up divisions and plant out in spring. Alternatively plant out divisions straight after splitting.

PROPAGATION-C-CUTTINGS

Cuttings are best taken in early summer, put a number of cuttings in a pot filled with a 50% mixture of sharp sand and compost. Insert the pot in to a polyurethane bag and tie the top, this will help stop water evaporating from the leaves and put of direct sun light. Check cuttings regularly to prevent cuttings rotting off, when signs of new growth appear this is a good indication rooting. When rooted pot up for planting out in the following autumn

PROPAGATION-D-BULBS

As most of the species take a long time to reach flowering size from seed, it may be easier to buy new stock or lift and divide large clumps of mature bulbs.

AGRIMONY (Agrimonia eupatoria) PROP A

Type Perennial

agrimony

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Open,dry places
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border or meadow
Size 600-1000mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Flowers on long erect stems
Wild Distribution Local in all parts
Agrimony, Agrimonia eupatoria. A native perennial common in the south, petering out to rare in the north. It is found on roadsides, grassland, hedge banks and field edges. Stems are upright, unbranched and hairy, with yellow flowers in a spike appearing from June to August. The fruits have a ring of hooks round the upper edge; these catch on to the fur of passing animals or the clothes of walkers, ensuring that the seed is spread over a wide area. This common flower of grassy places, in the eyes of the ancient was nothing if not versatile- it was held to be be a remedy against snake-bit, poor sight, loss of memory and liver complaints. It’s leaves are still used as a stimulating alternative to tea.

AUTUMN HAWKBIT (Leontodon autumnlis) PROP A

Type Perennial

a_hawk.

Season Summer/autumn
Wild Habitat Sunny dry sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border or meadow
Size 50-600mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Flowers on erect stems
Wild Distribution Common
Autumnal Hawkbit, Leontodon autumnlis. A native perennial, very common all over the British Isles growing on roadsides, meadows and screes. It has rosettes of more or less hair less, pinnately lobed leaves, the lobes deep and narrow, several solid stems forking near the top to bear yellow flower heads. It resembles Hypochoeris radicata ‘Cat’s-ear’ the main difference being Hawkbit flower heads are often streaked with red beneath instead of Cat’s-ear green.

BETONY (Stachys officinale) PROP A

Type Perennial

betony.

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Meadows
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border or meadow
Size 300-600mm
Flower colour Red/purple
Character Flowers on tall stems
Wild Distribution Common
Betony, Stachys officinale. A native perennial of open woods, hedgerows, grassland and heaths on light soil. Common in England and Wales but rare in Scotland and Ireland. Betony is a much less hairy plant than it’s relation Hedge Woundwort, with a well marked basal rosette of long-stalked, oblong leaves. The flowers have a long tube and a flat upper lip; the lower lip has no white markings. Betony was widely cultivated in physic gardens and monastery gardens and was regarded as almost a universal cure-all.  It’s leaves were made into poultices, ointments and infusions and the flowers were made into conserves.

BIRDSFOOT TREFOIL (Lotus corniculatus) PROP A

Type Perennial

bf_trefoil

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Dry open sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border or meadow
Size 100-300mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Clustered flowers above green mats
Wild Distribution Locally common
Birdsfoot Trefoil, Lotus corniculatus. A native perennial very common throughout the British Isles. Found on grasslands and roadsides and as a weed of lawns. Yellow flowers appear from June-September in stalked heads on solid stems. Trefoil suggests that the leaves have only three leaflets each, but there is in fact an extra pair of leaflets carried close to the stem.The caterpillars of the green hairstrak and dingy skipper butterflies feed on the plant. The folk names for this plant are remarkable for both their numbers and their diversity, however bird’s foot is the plants common name, reflects the seed pods resemblance to a bird’s claw.

BISTORT (Polygonum bistorta) PROP B

Type Perennial

bistort.

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Roadside verges
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border or meadow
Size 500-750mm
Flower colour White
Character Stiff flowers and stems
Wild Distribution Locally common in grassland
Bistort, Polygonum bistorta. A native perennial, common in the Lancashire area, scattered elsewhere, rare in Ireland.Grows on roadside and meadows often in large patches. A hairless, upright plant with unbranched stems. the leaves at the base have long stalks sheathing the stem, which has a single flower at its tip from May-August The flowers are in pairs one being male and one being female.. The young leaves are still used today in Yorkshire to make a pudding known as Easter-ledge. The 17th century herbalist Nicholas Culpeper recommended it as a cure for toothache.

BLADDER CAMPION (Silene vulgaris) PROP A

Type Perennial

b_camp

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Mainly coastal sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border or meadow
Size 300-500mm
Flower colour White
Character Loose flowers on thin stems
Wild Distribution Locally common by the sea
Bladder Campion, Silene vulgaris. A native perennial common field and roadside plant especially on limestone. Rare in north Scotland.Stems are erect, usually hairless, with drooping white flowers. Bladder campion has bisexual flowers (in addition to its rarer male flowers); but the sexes in each flower mature at different times.In the evening they emit their pleasant, clover-like scent. In most campions the sepals are joined to form a straight-sided or slightly bulging tube, but in bladder campion this tube is inflated like a balloon.

BLOODY CRANESBILL (Gernanium sanguineum) PROP A

Type Perennial

b_crane

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Coastal sites
Garden Habitat Sunny herbaceous border /rockery
Size 200-300mm
Flower colour Red
Character Masses of large bright flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common by sea
Bloody Cranesbill, Gernanium sanguineum. A native perennial this rare plant is found mainly on the coasts of northern England on dry, rocky places, on limestone, sand dunes, grasslands and woods. It forms bushy clumps of leaf stems, often sprawling and branched from the base. there are no basil leaves. the stem leaves are rounded or polygonal in outline, deeply 5-7 lobed, each lobe narrow and cut into three segments. The bright reddish-purple are borne singly on long stems from May to august.

BUSH VETCH (Vicia sepium) PROP A

Type Perennial

b_vetch

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Grassy sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border
Size 300-1000mm
Flower colour Purple
Character Trailing plant
Wild Distribution Common in fields
Bush Vetch, Vicia sepium. A native perennial, common throughout the British Isles growing in hedges, woods and as a garden weed. Stems may trail, or climb,  the leaves have five to nine pairs of leaflets and a branching tendril. Each short stalked flower-head has up to six blooms flowering early from April to September.The pods contain many seeds and are black. Bush vetch itself has no use to man, but like many other vetches it can be fed to livestock.

CAT'S EAR (Hypcchoeris radicata) PROP A

Type Perennial

c_ears

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Sunny dry sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border or meadow
Size 200-600mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Flowers on erect stems
Wild Distribution Common in meadows
Cat’s Ear, Hypcchoeris radicata. A native perennial, common in meadows, dunes, roadsides and waste places throughout Britain.The hairy leaves radiate from the base of the stem; they are wavy and edged with oblong or triangular teeth. The sparingly branched stem carries several flowers, the bright yellow flower-heads up to 4cm across are displayed from June onwards and attract many kinds of insects. The leaves may be used in a salad and can be gathered practically all year round.

COMMON MALLOW (Malva Sylvestris) PROP A

Type Perennial

c_mallow

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Dry, open sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border
Size 1000-2000mm
Flower colour Pink
Character Scattered flowers on tall stems
Wild Distribution Locally common on open sites
Common Mallow, Malva Sylvestris. A native perennial common on waste places and roadsides in England and Wales particularly the south; rarer in Scotland and Ireland. Leaves at the base are rounded; stem leaves are ivy-shaped, large pink flowers are produced from June-September. These turn to round fruits, called ‘cheeses’ after their shape, which contain many nutlets. Crushed mallow leaves were used to draw out wasp stings, and the gummy sap was made into poultices and soothing ointment.

COMMON TOADFLAX (Linaria vulgaris) PROP A

Type Perennial

c_toad

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Dry open sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border
Size 700-100mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Snapdragon type flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common
Common Toadflax, Linaria vulgaris. A native perennial common in England and Wales, becoming rare in the north west of Scotland and rare in Ireland.Grows on roadsides, wasteplaces, grassy places, cultivated fields and even woods. This grey-green plant has creeping roots and upright flowering stems, which are usually branched. The leaves are long and straight-sided. The flower has oval or lance-shaped pointed sepals. the flower tube is two-lipped; the lips close the end of the tube, which is elongated into a long spur these appear from July-October. Its name derives from the fact its leaves are similar to the leaves of the flax, and the plant was regarded as so useless as to be fit only for toads.

COMMON VETCH (Vicia sativa) PROP A

Type Annual

b_vetch

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Grassy sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border
Size 150-200mm
Flower colour Purple
Character Trailing plant
Wild Distribution Common in fields
Common Vetch, Vicia sativa. A native annual of hedges, wood edges and grassy places.More common in the south-east; rare in the north-west and west Ireland. The leaf has four to eight pairs of leaflets, often heart-shaped at the tip, and a branched tendril. Common vetch can be distinguished from the other British vetches, as it has a pair of flowers and two black-blotched stipules at the base of each leaf. The flowers appear from May-September turning into smooth or slightly hairy pods with a long beak. Despite its name this is not the most common of the vetches.

COWSLIP (Primula veris) PROP A

Type Perennial

c_slip

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Dry open sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border
Size 200-300mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Loose flowerheads
Wild Distribution Locally common on limey soils
Cowslip, Primula veris. A native perennial Common in meadows and on banks in England, Wales and central Ireland Rare elsewhere.Wrinkled, toothed leaves, finely hairy on both sides but not floury white form rosettes from which rise one or more flowering stems. The yellow flowers are drooping and their petals less wide-spreading than those of the primrose, appearing from April-May. The delicately perfumed cowslips are used to make one of the best and most potent of country wines.

CUCKOO FLOWER (Cardamine pratensis) PROP A


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DEVIL'S SCABIOUS (Succisa pratensis) PROP A


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DROPWORT (Filipendula vulgaris) PROP A


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DYER'S ROCKET (Reseda luteola) PROP A


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FIELD SCABIOUS (Knautia arvensis) PROP A


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FLEABANE (Pulicaria dysenterica) PROP A


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FRITILLARY (Fritillaria meleagris) PROP D


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GREAT BURNET (Poterium officinalis) PROP A


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GREATER CELANDINE (Chelidonium majus) PROP A


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GREATER KNAPWEED (Centaurea scabiosa) PROP A


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GREATER PLANTAIN (Plantago major) PLAN A


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GREATER STITCHWORT (Stellaria holostea) PROP C


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HAIR TARE (Vicia hirsuta) PROP A


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HAREBELL (Campanula rotundifolia) PROP A


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HARE'S-FOOT CLOVER (Trifolium arvense) PROP A


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HOARY PLANTAIN (Plantago media) PROP A


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JACOB'S LADDER (Polemonium Caeruleum) PROP A


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LADIE'S FINGERS (Anthyllis vulneraria) PROP A


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LADY'S BEDSTRAW (Galium verum) PROP A


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LESSER KNAPWEED (Centaurea nigra) PROP A


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MAIDEN PINK (Dianthus deltoides)


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MEADOWSWEET (Filipendula ulmaria) PROP A


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MEADOW BUTTERCUP (Ranunculus acris) PROP A


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MEADOW CRANESBILL (Geranium pratense) PROP A


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MUSK MALLOW (Malva moschata) PROP A


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NOTTINGHAM CATCHFLY (Silene nutans) PROP A


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OXLIP (Primula elatior) PROP B


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OX-EYE DAISY (Leucanthemum vulgare) PROP A


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PERFORATE ST JOHNS WORT (Hypericum perforatum) PROP A


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