Shade – Flowers

header-shaded-flowers

When collecting your materials for propagation be aware of the following:

1: Never remove plants or bulbs from the wild.
2: When seed collecting ensure you have the land owners permission to be on the land and to take the seeds.

 

PROPAGATION-A -SEEDS

Collect seeds when in season and stratify immediately and sow the following spring. They require no special treatment just let them weather and the frost to get to them.

PROPAGATION-B- DIVISION

Lift plant in Autumn and split root ball, pot up divisions and plant out in spring. Alternatively plant out divisions straight after splitting.

PROPAGATION-C-CUTTINGS

Cuttings are best taken in early summer, put a number of cuttings in a pot filled with a 50% mixture of sharp sand and compost. Insert the pot in to a polyurethane bag and tie the top, this will help stop water evaporating from the leaves and put of direct sun light. Check cuttings regularly to prevent cuttings rotting off, when signs of new growth appear this is a good indication rooting. When rooted pot up for planting out in the following autumn

PROPAGATION-D-BULBS

As most of the species take a long time to reach flowering size from seed, it may be easier to buy new stock or lift and divide large clumps of mature bulbs.

COLOUR KEY: NATIVE / NON NATIVE

 

AUTUMN CROCUS (Colchicum autumnale) BULB - PROP A

Type Perennial bulb

a_crocus

Season Autumn
Wild Habitat Open & semi-shaded sites
Garden Habitat Semi-shade
Size 50-300mm
Flower colour Purple/pink
Character ‘Naked’ flowers in autumn
Wild Distribution Rare
Autumn Crocus, Colchicum autumnale. A native corm. Very rare except in the area around the Bristol Channel, may be quite prolific where found. Grows in damp meadows and woods. Also know as Meadow Saffron. The flowers appear in autumn without any leaves or stems. When the flowers die back they leave the developing fruiting capsule at soil level; this enlarges and emerges with the leaves in the following spring. The plant is very poisonous, containing colchicine which disrupts cell division; making the plant very useful for genetic experiments.

BEECH FERN (Phegopteris connectilis) PLANT - PROP D

Type Perennial fern
Season Summer
Wild Habit Shaded woods & rocks acid
Garden Habit Semi shade or under trees
Size 100-300mm
Flower colour Green foliage only
Character Short fronds from creeping roots
Wild distribution Local on northern hills/woods
Beech Fern, Phegopteris connectilis. This plant should establish easily and will soon start to spread. Although preferring acid soils it is not too fussy in a garden, but does like acid soil.

BLUE BELL (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) BULB - PROP B/D

Type Perennial bulb

b_bell

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Woodlands
Garden Habitat Semi-shade
Size 300-400mm
Flower colour Blue
Character Drooping flowers from arched stems
Wild Distribution Common in woods
Bluebell, Hyacinthoides non-scripta. Very common in England and Scotland less common in Ireland, not in Orkney or Shetland. Found in woods and shady places, often in dense patches. The flowers, also pink or white, have a rich scent, picking the flowers does not damage the plant, but treading down the leaves does.Bluebells grow hot only in oak woods, but also in in hedges and sometimes in heathland. Their numbers are declining due to overpicking and with the disappearance of the woods and heaths.

BROAD BUCKLER FERN (Dryopteris dilatata) PLANT - PROP B

Type Perennial Fern
Season Spring/summer
Wild habitat Woodlands
Garden Habitat Shaded sites
Size 1000-2000mm
Flower colour Green (foliage)
Character Wide arching fronds
Wild Distribution Commom in woods
Broad Buckler Fern, Dryopteris dilatata.In any shaded spot this fern will grow well. Ideally it prefers an acid soil but will adapt to most garden soils. Do give it plenty of room to spread its fronds.

COLUMBINE (Aquilegia vulgaris) SEED - PROP A

Type Perennial

columbine

Season Spring/summer
Wild Habitat Semi-shade
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border
Size 800-1000mm
Flower colour Purple/blue/white
Character Pendulous flowers from erect stems
Wild Distribution Local on limey soils
Columbine, Aquilegia vulgaris. In Britain it is found in wet woods and other wet places, scattered locally through England, Wales and southern Scotland. Its dumpy blue flowers are immediately recognisable; the five petal-like sepals have short clams and the five similar petals have elongated, hollow claws containing nectar. An infusion has been used to treat a sore mouth or throat and as a lotion for rheumatism. However, this plant is poisonous.

COMMON VIOLET (Viola riviniana) PL-SE - PROP B/A

Type Perennial

c_violet

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 50-100mm
Flower colour Violet
Character Masses of flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common
Common Dog Violet, Viola riviniana.Very common throughout the British Isles. Found in woods, heaths and hedges.May grow in great clumps with long-stalked, heart shaped leaves and up to 20 or 30 flowers. The flowers are blue-violet in colour but  can also be white.

ENCHANTERS NIGHTSHADE (Circaea lutetiana) PLANT - PROP B

Type Perennial

e_nightshade

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade/under trees
Size 300-450mm
Flower Colour White
Character Dainty flowers
Wild Disribution Common in shaded areas
Enchanter’s Nightshade, Circaea lutetiana. Forms wide colonies in woods, hedgerows and shady places throughout the British Isles, rarely in the northeast. It grows erect stems which have large, pointed-ovate leaves and elongated racemes of tiny white flowers late in summer. Its fruits are bristly capsules, pointing downwards like the flowers.

FEVERFEW (Tanacetum parthenium) SEED - PROP A

Type Perennial herb

Feverfew

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Shaded places
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 300-900mm
Flower Colour White
Character Clusters of flowers & aromatic foliage
Wild Distribution Common in waste sites
Feverfew, Tanacetum parthenium. Possibly introduced perennial found on walls, waste sites, hedgerows and roadsides. Fairly common throughout Britain but rare in Ireland. Feverfew was a popular herb of physic gardens and has been used against fever. Infusions are taken to ease colic, to aid digestion and as a tonic.It can also be used as an insecticide, like pyrethrum.

FOXGLOVE (Digitalis purpurea) SEED - PROP A

Type Biennial

f_glove

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Semi-shaded sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous Border/shade
Size 1000-2000mm
Flower Colour Purple/red
Character Tall stems with many flowers on each
Wild Distribution Common woodland edge
Foxglove, Digitalis purpurea. A native biennial common in woods, hedgerows and open places throughout Britain, it is often grow in gardens. It an extremely poisonous plant, digitalin which is a powerful drug used to treat heart disease is extracted from the leaves.

GIANT BELLFLOWER (Campanula latifolia) SEED - PROP A

Type Perennial

g_bellflower

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Shaded sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border
Size 1000-1500mm
Flower Colour Light blue
Character Tall flowers with cluster of bells
Wild Distribution Local on lime-rich soils
Great Bellflower, Campanula latifolia. A native perennial of woods, hedgebanks and near streams. Rare in north west Scotland and southern England and absent from Ireland. Fairly common elsewhere. The lower leaves are nettle-shaped and stalked. Young shoots may be cooked and eaten as a green vegetable. The flowers are blue, bell-like in the leaf axils pointing upwards.

GIANT WOODRUSH (Luzula sylvatica) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial

g_woodrush

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Open or shaded sites
Garden Habitat Marsh/shade
Size 500-1000mm
Flower Colour Brown
Character Loose flowers on tall stems
Wild Distribution Locally common
Giant Woodrush, Luzula sylvatica. Grows in acid soils, in woodland (particularly oak woods) and moorland throughout the British Isles. It is the largest of the woodrushes, with tussocky clumps of glossy, broadly linear leaves flowering stems in early summer. they bear numerous clusters of chestnut brown flowers in a loose, spreading, much branched flat topped head.

GOLDEN ROD (Solidago virgaurea) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial

g_rod

Season Summer/autumn
Wild Habitat Sunny rocks/shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade or Herbaceous border
Size 300-900mm
Flower Colour Yellow
Character Clusters of yellow flowers
Wild Distribution Common in woods & acid rocks
Golden-rod, Solidago virgaurea. A native perennial of dry pasture, heaths, mountain slopes and roadsides.It has a clump of basal leaves, lance-shaped with toothed margins, and a leafy flowering stem with a terminal inflorescence of yellow flower heads on straight, erect stems. Rare in the south east but common elsewhere in Britain particularly Scotland. Once used in folk medicine to treat both internal and external wounds.

HAREBELL (Campanula rotundifolia) PLANT - PROP A

Type perennial

harebell

Season Summer/autumn
Wild Habitat Open, dry sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border
Size 300-450mm
Flower Colour Light china-blue
Character Clustered bells on slender stems
Wild Distribution Common in most areas
Harebell, Campanula rotundifolia. A native perennial of dry, grassy places, fixed dunes, hedgebanks and roadsides.Common throughout Britain, though rare in south and east Ireland, Cornwall and Devon. Although the stems leaves are long and thin, there are small, round long-stalked lower leaves. The nodding blue bell-like flowers appear in the latter part of summer. The plant is called the Bluebell in Scotland.

HARTSTONGUE FERN (Asplenium scolopendrium) SEED - PROP A

Type Perennial
Season Summer/autumn
Wild Habitat Shaded sites
Garden habitat Shade/rockery
Size 300-400mm
Flower Colour Green (foliage)
Character Simple fronds
Wide Distribution Common in limey woodlands
Hartstongue Fern, Asplenium scolopendrium. This fern will grow best in a shaded part of a rockery or border shaded by trees/shrubs. It prefers a limey soil.

HEDGE GARLIC (Alliaria petiolata) PLANT - PROP A

Type Biennial

h_garlic

Season Summer/autumn
Wild Habitat Semi-shade
Garden Habitat Shade/Hedgerow
Size 800-1200mm
Flower Colour White
Character Flowers on tall stems
Wild Distribution Common roadside plant
Hedge Garlic, Alliaria petiolata. A native perennial which is common in England but scattered in Scotland and Ireland. It grows best where the soil is rich in mineral nutrients. The plant starts in the first year with a rosette of long-stalked, dark green, kidney-shaped, toothed leaves. The second year sees a tall flowering stem producing white flowers. Which turn to long, cylindrical and curved seed pods. It is found in wood edges, hedges and gardens. Its leaves may be boiled or eaten raw. If crushed they smell of garlic.

HEDGE WOUNDWORT (Stachys sytvactica) PLANT - PROP A/B

Type Perennial

h_woundwort

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Semi-shade/roadsides
Garden Habitat Herbaceous Border
Size 500-1000mm
Flower Colour Red
Character Whorls of flowers
Wild Distribution Common in hedgerows
Hedge Woundwort, Stachys sytvactica. This native perennial is common throughout the British Isles growing in woods, ditches and shady places. It has long green rhizomes and leafy stems, which if bruised give off an unpleasant smell. In late summer the flowers form spikes at the ends of the stems, growing in well separated whorls in the axils of bracts. They are reddish purple with white markings and have toothed calyces. It has antiseptic properties and at one time its leaves were made into poultices to bind around wounds.

HERB BENNETT (Geum urbanum) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial

h_bennet

Season Summer
Wild habitat Shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 600-800mm
Flower Colour Yellow
Character Small star flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common
Herb Bennet, Geum urbanum. This native perennial is common throughout except the north of Scotland.Growing on damp soils in woods, clearings,hedges or any shady places. It forms a clump of hairy compound leaves; each leaf has 2-3 pairs of lateral leaflets and one large, lobed terminal leaflet. Small, yellow flowers appear in loose clusters on separate, leaf stalks appearing in early summer. It was used by the Romans as a substitute for quinine, the roots give off a smell of cloves and is said to repel evil spirits if hung by the door.

IVY (Hedera helix) PLANT - PROP C

Type Perennial shrublet

ivy

Season All
Wild Habitat Shade or semi-shade
Garden Habitat Shade/woodland
Size Long trailing strands
Flower Colour Green (foliage)
Character Evergreen groundcover or climber
Wild distribution Common in woods
Ivy, Hedera helix. A native perennial climber which is common in woods, on hedges, walls and rocks, both climbing and creeping. Stems may reach30m in length. The flowering shoots have different shaped leaves from the non-flowering climbing stems which have the typical ivy-shaped leaf. When in flower Ivy is usually covered in insects since it is one of the few plants providing abundant honey at this time of year Sept to Nov. Its fruit forms by November and ripens by Christmas, the berries were once recommended as a cure for rheumatism.

LADY FERN (Athyrium filix-femina) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial fern
Season Spring/summer
Wild Habitat Shaded woodland
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 1000-1500mm
Flower Colour Green (foliage)
Character Large graceful fronds
Wild Disribution Common in woods
Lady Fern, Athyrium filix-femina. Avery easy plant to grow in ahy shaded spot in the garden, not being fussy about soil type.

LIMESTONE POLYPODY (Gymnocarpium robertianum) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial fern
Season Spring/summer
Wild Habitat Limestone rocks
Garden Habitat Rockery/shade
Size 100-300mm
Flower colour Green (foliage)
Character Delicate fronds
Wild Distribution Local on limestone
Limestone Polypody, Gymnocarpium robertianum. Any well drained, gravelly soil will suit this fern well: being particularly happy with lime in the soil. Shade or semi-shade is the best location

MALE FERN (Dryopteris filix-mas) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial fern
Season Spring/summer
Wild Habitat Woodland
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 1000-2000mm
Flower colour Green(foliage)
Character Long erect fronds
Wild Distribution Common in woods
Male fern, Dryopteris filix-mas. Avery easy species to establish in either shade or sun. Ahy garden soil will suffice apart from saturated gronud. It does need plenty of room to grow.

MELANCHOLY THISTLE (Cirsium helenoides) PLANT - PROP B

Type Perennial

m_thistle

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Semi-shaded sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous
Size 1000-1500mm
Flower colour Purple
Character Tall thistle-like flowers
Wild Distribution Local on lime rich soil
Melancholy Thistle, Cirsium helenoides. This native perennial of hilly grasslands, scrub and by streams. Fairly common in Scotland and North England; rare or absent elsewhere. It is a colonial plant with creeping underground stems and a patch of erect, cottony, very leafy stems up to 4ft high. Between June and August it produces a solitary red-purple flower head at the top of each stem which droop at first, hence the name melancholy.

NETTLE LEAVED BELLFLOWER (Campanula trachelium) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial
Season Summer
Wild Habitat Woodland
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border/shade
Size 1000-1500mm
Flower colour blue/purple
Character Tall stems with large bells
Wild Distribution Local in woodlands
Nettle-Leaved bellflower, Campanula trachelium. A native perennial of woods and hedgebanks usually on clay. Fairly common in south England and Wales, rare in Ireland and absent from Scotland.It has clumps of long-stalked, heart-shaped basal leaves. July to September sees tall erect bristly-hairy  flowering stems, with blue-purple bell like flowers. A common name is Throatwort which indicates its medicinal use in treating sore throats and tonsillitis.

STAR OF BETHLEHEM (Ornithogalum umbellatum) BULB - PROP B/D

Type Perennial bulb

bethlehem

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Shade or sun
Garden Habitat Shade or herbaceous border
Size 50-300mm
Flower colour White/green
Character Bright starry flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common in grassland
Star of Bethlehem, Ornithogalum umbellatum. Probably native, common in the south east of England, uncommon in Scotland, unknown in Ireland. Spreads into large patches due to it forming new bulbs each year in grassy places. Grass-like leaves grooved, with a white stripe down the midrib form at the base. A leafless flowering stem growing up to 1ft with starry, white flowers borne in flat-topped terminals racemes. The back of the petals are green striped.

OAK FERN (Gymnocarpium dryopteris) PLANT - PROP B

Type Perennial fern
Season Spring/summer
Wild Habitat Woodlands
Garden Habitat Shade/rockery
Size 100-200mm
Flower colour Green (foliage)
Character Delicate fronds on wiry stems
Wild Distribution Local in acid woods
Oak Fern, Gymnocarpium dryopteris. Given an acid well-drained soil in shade this fern will grow most happily. Its rate of spread is quite slow.

OXLIP (Primula elatior) PLANT - PROP A/B

Type Perennial

oxlip

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Damp woodland
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 200-300mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Loose flowerheads on stiff stems
Wild Distribution Rare in woodlands
Oxlip, Primula elatior. A native perennial. Common in a small area around Cambridge on the boulder clay. From a rosette of wrinkled leaves a stout flowering stalk is produced between April and May. Bearing a one-sided umbel of pale yellow flowers which are like small unscented primroses with orange markings.o

PENDULOUS SEDGE (Carex pendula) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial

p_sedge

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Open, damp sites
Garden Habitat Shade or damp sites
Size 1500-2000mm
Flower colour Brown
Character Large rigid leaves
Wild Distribution Common in damp places
Pendulous Sedge, Carex pendula. This native perennial can be found in damp woods and on the banks of shaded steam, growing across most of the British Isles, becoming rarer in the north. This is the tallest of the sedges, clumps of broad, yellow-green leaves and leafy flowering stems can reach up to 6ft in height.The plant flowers in summer; each stem has 1-2 narrow male spikes at the top and 4-5 elongated, hanging, dense-flowered female spikes lower down, widely separated from each other.

PRIMROSE (Primula vulgaris) PLANT - PROP B

Type Perennial

primrose

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Shaded banks
Garden Habitat Shade or meadow
Size 50-100mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Clusters of flowers
Wild Distribution Woodlands & grassbanks
Primrose, Primula vulgaris. A native perennial common throughout the British Isles, is one of the most beloved of spring flowers. Its name comes from prima rosa “the first rose”. Sadly it is becoming less common as many plants have been destroyed by modern farming or dug up and taken away.In spring pale yellow, scented flowers appear from a base of wrinkeled. lance-shaped leaves tapering to the base. The plant was once used in herb medicine as a sedative and remedy for gout and rheumatism.

RAMSONS (Allium ursinum) PLANT - PROP B/D

Type Perennial bulb

r_som

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Woodland
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 100-300mm
Flower colour White
Character Cluster of stars on stiff stems
Wild Distribution Woodlands on limestone
Ramsons, Allium ursinum.A native perennial which is common over most of the British Isles, rare in Ireland and north Scotland. Growing in damp woods and hedgerows, it has a strong distinctive scent like rancid onions. Two bright green, elliptical leaves and one flowering stem appear from solitary bulbs in spring. The white , starry flowers are borne in flat topped umbels cupped in a membranous spathe, growing on two-angled or three-angled stems.

RED CAMPION (Silene dioica) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial

campion_r

Season Spring/summer
Wild Habitat Semi-shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade or Herbaceous border
Size 600-1000mm
Flower colour Red/pink
Character Many bright flowers
Wild Distribution Common near shade
Red Campion, Silene dioica. A native biennial or perennial, common everywhere except southern Ireland and the Hebrides where it is rare.This must be one of the most attractive of the campions, growing in woods, hedgerows and shady places, forming  clumps of  numerous short non-flowering shoots and many flowering shoots reaching up to 3ft  in early summer. Producing many rose-red flowers from May through to November, male and female flowers being separate.

SNOWDROP (Galanthus nivalis) BULB - PROP B/D

Type Perennial bulb

sn_drop

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Woodland
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 30-100mm
Flower colour White
Character Drooping flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common in woods
Snowdrop, Galanthus nivalis. A bulbous perennial  probably native, growing across Great Britain becoming rare in  Scotland. Growing in damp woods, hedgerows and by streams. Producing small clumps of linear, grey-green leaves in winter, joined before they are fully developed by flowering stems. On which appear nodding white flowers comprising of   three pure white, spreading outer periath segments and three smaller inner periath segments which are green-spotter and notched at their tips. Also know has the flower of ‘ Hope’.

SWEET WOODRUFF (Galium odoratum) PLANT - PROP B

Type Perennial

woodruff

Season Spring/summer
Wild Habitat Shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 100-200mm
Flower colour White
Character Spreading plant
Wild Distribution Locally common in woods
Sweet Woodruff, Galium odoratum. A native perennial, common in England, Wales and southern Scotland. rare in the far north and in Ireland. From creeping rhizomes come unbranched stems, each stem has several whorls of 6-8 firm, lance shaped leaves with a cluster of white flowers at the top. It grows in shady places and damp woods on base-rich soils, forming a carpet of leaves and flowers in early summer.When cut and dried it smells of new-mown hay and was once used in draws and cupboards to keep clothes smelling sweet.It may also be added to scent summer drinks, liqueurs and perfumes.

WELSH POPPY (Meconopsis cambrica) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial

w_poppy

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Dry shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 300-400mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Bright single flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common

Welsh Poppy, Meconopsis cambrica. A native perennial growing in damp, rocky sites in south west England and Wales. From a clump of pinnately lobed leaves, early summer sees erect, leafy flowering stems bearing solitary yellow flowers on long stalks appearing.


White Campion (Silene alba) SEED - PROP A

Type Perennial

w_campion

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Sunny/shaded dry sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous
Size 600-1000mm
Flower colour White
Character Flowers on tall stems
Wild Distribution Common in fields

White Campion, Silene.alba.A native perennial common all over, except near the west coast and in Ireland. Unlike Silene dioica, this is a sticky-hairy plant, with pointed leaves and white flowers which appear two weeks later than the red. It commonly hybridises with red campion and produces pink coloured flowers.It is found in grassy places, hedgerows, cultivated and waste land, mostly common in lowland areas.


WILD ANGELICA (Angelica sylvestris) SEED - PROP A

Type Perennial

w-angelica

Season Summer
Wild Habitat Tall herb areas
Garden Habitat Herbaceous Border
Size 1000-1500mm
Flower colour White
Character Umbels of flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common
Wild Angelica, Angelica sylvestris is a stout, almost hairless plant, with hollow, finely ribbed stems growing up to 2m (6ft) tall, often tinged with purple and with a whitish bloom. The lower leaves measure up to 60cm (2ft) long and are twice- or three-times pinnate, with long stalks and lance-shaped, serrated segments; upper leaves are reduced to inflated sheaths partly enclosing the developing umbels. The flowers may be white or pink, borne in large umbels with 15-40 rays. The fruits are oval with membranous wings. This plant grows in damp meadows, woods and fens throughout Europe and the British Isles.

WILD CYCLAMEN (Cyclamen hederifolium) BULB - PROP B/D

Type Perennial bulb

cyclamen

Season Autumn
Wild Habitat Semi-shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 50-100mm
Flower colour White/pink
Character Marble-veined leaves
Wild Distribution Rare in woods

Wild Cyclamen, Cyclamen hederifolium. An introduced corm, rarely naturalised in woods and hedgerows in England and Wales. the leaf does not normally occur with the flowers but appears when flowering has finished. The flowers may be pink or white and like all cyclamen flowers they are nodding, with reflexed petal-lobes and quite distinctive.


WILD DAFFODIL (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) BULB - PROP B/D

Type Perennial bulb

w_daff

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Shade or open sites
Garden Habitat Herbaceous border or meadow
Size 100-400mm
Flower colour Pale yellow
Character Dainty flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common

Wild Daffodil,. Narcissus pseudonarcissus. A native bulb found wild in England and Wales but not in Scotland or Ireland.They form springtime clumps of broad linear leaves, with leafless flowering stems and solitary, drooping yellow flowers. Each flower has a spreading, pale yellow perianth and a deep yellow corona (trumpet).


WILD STRAWBERRY (Fragaris vesca) PLANT - PROP C

Type Perennial

w_stberry

Season Summer/autumn
Wild Habitat Semi- shade
Garden Habitat Borders or shade
Size 100-200mm
Flower colour White
Character Delicious fruit on trailing foliage
Wild Distribution Loclly common
Wild Strawberry, Fragaris vesca. A native perennial common throughtout the British Isles. It is found on dry grassland and woods. The flowers are white with the petals close together and unnotched. The fruit is delicious with a stronger flavour than the cultivated strawberry. The name goes back to Anglo-Saxon days, before AD1000, and is much older than than the practice of cultivating strawberries. In old English, one meaning of straw was small particles of chaff; and the name may have been given to the scattering of pips (achenes) over the surface of the fruit.

WOOD ANEMONE (Anemone nemerosa) BULB - PROP B/D

Type Perennial bulb

w_anemone

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Open or shade sites
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 50-200mm
Flower colour White
Character Masses of delicate flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common in semi-shade
Wood Anemone, Anemone nemerosa. A native perennial very common in woods throughout the British Isles except southern Ireland, where it is rare. Absent from the Shetlands, Orkneys and Hebrides. Although they are woodland plants they need more sunlight than can penetrate thick over grown places, and only flower profusely in deciduous woods and coppices. The flowers appear from March to May and can vary in colour white. pink or even purple.The scent of wood aneones is not as attractive as their appearance, and has earned them the alternative name of ‘ smell foxes’.

WOOD SAGE (Teucrium scorodonia) PLANT - PROP A

Type Perennial

w_sage

Season Summer/autumn
Wild Habitat Dry sunny or shaded sites
Garden Habitat Rockery or shade
Size 300-600mm
Flower colour Cream
Character Short spikes of flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common
Wood Sage, Teucrium scorodonia. A native perennial common in woods, grassland, heath, hedgebanks and roadsides throughout Britain. Particularly on dry calcareous soil. Pale green/cream flowers are produced on flowering stems with bracts beneath the flowers which are smaller than the leaves, and have no teeth from July to September. In taste and smell, it resembles hops, and not surprisingly it has been used as a substitute for them in some areas. the plant gives a bitter flavour, and is said to clarify beer very quickly, although it leaves the liquid with a strong colour. The plant is not a true sage, although, like sage, it belongs to the mint family.

WOOD SORREL (Oxalis acetosella) PLANT - PROP B

Type Perennial

w-sorrel

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Dry shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 50-100mm
Flower colour White/pink
Character Delicate veined flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common in woods
Wood Sorrel, Oxalis acetosella. A native perennial of woods and hedges common throughout the British Isles. This plant produces two sorts of flowers. The first, is the familiar, usually lilac-veined spring flower of woodland floors, drooping at night or in rain to protect the pollen. Abundant nectar attracts bees and beetles,but for all this it produces very little seed. the second more prolific is produced in summer, is carried on a short stalk close to the ground and seldom opens. These flowers pollinate them selves and produce most seeds. The three part clover like leaves fold down at night and may be eaten in a salad.

YELLOW ARCHANGEL (Lamiastrum galeobdolon) PLANT - PROP C

Type Perennial

y_arch

Season Spring
Wild Habitat Shaded sites
Garden Habitat Shade
Size 300-500mm
Flower colour Yellow
Character Spikes of flowers
Wild Distribution Locally common in woods
Yellow Archangel, Lamiastrum galeobdolon. A native perennial found in woods and clearings; common in southern and central England, rare elsewhere.This plant is closely related to the red and white dead-nettles which because they are still in flower on September 29, the day dedicated to the Archangel Michael, are sometimes called red and white archangel. Yellow archangel has a shorter flowering period (May-June), but shares the same nickname because of its similarity.It also shares their reputation as guardians against evil spirits and spells, and for protecting cattle against black magic disease, elf-shot. Flowering stems are leafy and upright. The oval stalked leaves are hairy, irregularly toothed and borne in opposite pairs.